Video Clips

Review of "Vegetables for the Irish Garden"

Klaus has spent many years learning the art and craft of vegetable growing, experimenting with different plants and techniques, and passing
on his knowledge to countless students of all ages. The last xxx years have been spent in Ireland, where you could say that his teacher has been the Irish climate and Irish conditions.

So he has mastered the vagaries of boggy soils, high rainfall, the most common pests and diseases, and has distilled what he has learnt into this book. It
embraces everything from lazy beds to green manuring: there’s even a section on the common mistakes beginners make. This book will be an invaluable source of information for vegetable growers here - novices and experienced alike.

Joy Larkcom

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“Not that I want to be a god or a hero. Just to change into a tree, grow for ages, not hurt anyone”. --Czeslaw Milosz - ‘Longing’

The first three letters of the ancient Irish Ogam alphabet were not A, B, C but B, L, N. Every letter of Ogam had a word associated with it, and many of these words were tree-names.

B was known as Beithe ‘Birch’, L as Luis ‘Rowan’, and N as Nin ‘Ash’. The whole alphabet was often called Beithe Luis Nin.

The letters were termed feda ‘trees’, and a single letter-score was called flesc ‘twig’. The Modern Irish word for ‘hyphen’ is fleiscín.--Seanchas.

“What we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves" ”.--Mahatma Ghandi’

“A society grows great when old men plant trees, under whose shade they know they shall never sit”. - Greek proverb.